Picture frames with Ivy leaves

How to Get the Most Out of Your Content


07.20.17
Content marketing is an investment of time, effort, and money—make sure you get the most out of it with the three “re”s: repackage, reframe, and repost.

Going for the Award: To Apply or Not to Apply?


02.28.14
How do you decide which awards to “go for”? A thoughtful submission requires time on top of your established workload. The next time your boss passes an opportunity your way, ask yourself these essential questions before spending hours—yes, hours—filling out that application.

Apostrophes Ain’t Got No Respect


10.08.13
Forget mangled contractions. Put aside rules that pertain to arcane usages. Let’s keep the conversation simple, as in possessives. The rules for apostrophes as possessives are simple. An apostrophe points to an owner, whether single or plural. Think of an apostrophe as an arrow literally pointing to the owner.

It’s Always a Good Idea to Keep the Campaign Fresh


08.20.13
We’re having a lot of fun with the campaign “It’s Always a Good Idea.” Thus far, we’ve rolled out a few different scenarios to keep the campaign fresh.

How to Write a Better Request for Proposal: RFPs from the Consultant’s Side of the Desk


06.27.12
The premise appears simple: libraries want to hire a consultant with the expertise their organization needs, and consultants seek interesting projects with clients that are …

Do You Have the Write Words?


04.27.12
One of the most common questions we get from clients (and from each other!) is, “How can a site get noticed by Google?” It’s a testament to Google’s dominance in the search market that, as web developers, many of the decisions we make are driven by the need to catch Google’s eye. What we’ve found can be summarized: search engines like useful content and useful content is well-written content. So let’s talk about writing content for the web!

The Lost Art of Proofreading


01.13.12
In this instant age, we think we don’t have time to proofread. Or, we say, “That’s why they created spell check.” But sending e-mails and documents with typographical errors and poor grammar says that you don’t care. You don’t care enough to re-read what you’ve written, or run spell check, or double check how to spell someone’s name. And if you don’t care about your interpersonal communication, you’re saying you don’t care about the person with whom you’re communicating. It’s personal.

Punctuation kills, thrills


10.19.11
Regardless of where you come down on the Great Serial Comma Debate, the thing to remember is this: when writing for a media audience (news releases), use AP style.