Spring Cleaning At The Office


Nothing can be more spring-like than cleaning out files.  It also becomes a trip down memory lane.

Here's a sampling of what I found:

1989: We developed Profit Pals for Scott Paper Company and then went on the road to talk to environmentalists about Styrofoam.

1993: Cable television executives sat around a table with us trying to decide if homeowners would pay $9.95 a month.

1997: Boar's Head Inn had to dump the pig from its logo before The Meat People came after them for mark infringement. Twenty-odd versions later, we arrived at an elegant solution. No lipstick was killed in the making of that logo.

1998: The Ivy Group surveyed University of Virginia students to assess their satisfaction with programs and price sensitivities in order to come up with strategies to promote attendance. (This was the group that, pre-JPJ, brought talent such as the young Bruce Springsteen and Talking Heads to town.) Unfortunately for the Union, athletic events and frat parties were more popular.

2001: We rebranded the transitioning-to-online-services of Claude Moore Health Sciences Library at the University of Virginia. The new tagline? "Information...STAT!" I still like that one.

2003: Working with Sheryl Wagner (now in Staunton's tourism office), we developed a series of ads promoting Lexington and Rockbridge County. How do you put those endless mountain vistas and the region's eminent military history and traditions in one package? "Above and Beyond the Call of Beauty!"

2004: Conducted a multi-day photo shoot for a new corporate brochure for Madison Wood Preservers in Culpeper, Virginia.  When it didn't rain, it was steamy. Fortunately, the wood didn't notice the difference. Now, that's quality!

2005: Kreischer Miller, a Philadelphia accounting firm, looked to us to reposition it and rebrand its services. Around "People. Ideas. Solutions.", we created a family of publications and an advertising program for them to manage internally.  One ad, as I recall, featured a zebra. I'll leave it to you to conjecture the headline.